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Southern Florida in late February. Last updated: 3/9/2010.

Above and below: An adult Purple Gallinule in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Above and below: An adult Purple Gallinule in the Everglades (2/26/2010).

Above and below: An adult Purple Gallinule in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Above and below: An adult Purple Gallinule in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Above and below: An adult Purple Gallinule in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Above and below: An adult Purple Gallinule in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: An immature Purple Gallinule foraging nearby (2/26/2010).

An immature Purple Gallinule foraging nearby (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

An immature Purple Gallinule foraging nearby (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Broad-winged Hawk in the Everglades (2/26/2010).

A Broad-winged Hawk in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Wood Stork relaxes along the Anhinga Trail in the Everglades (2/26/2010).

A Wood Stork relaxes along the Anhinga Trail in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Black Vultures posing for close-up portraits. Click any image to enjoy vulture details you might not have seen so closely... Am I the only person who thinks of elephant skin?

Black Vultures posing for close-up portraits. Click any image to enjoy vulture details you might not have seen so closely... Am I the only person who thinks of elephant skin? Photo by Bill Hubick.

Black Vultures posing for close-up portraits. Click any image to enjoy vulture details you might not have seen so closely... Am I the only person who thinks of elephant skin? Photo by Bill Hubick.

Black Vultures posing for close-up portraits. Click any image to enjoy vulture details you might not have seen so closely... Am I the only person who thinks of elephant skin? Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Anhingas enjoying the good life in the Everglades (2/26/2010).

Anhingas enjoying the good life in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Anhingas enjoying the good life in the Everglades (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Double-crested Cormorant portrait. Click for high-resolution version.

A Double-crested Cormorant portrait. Click for high-resolution version. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Definitely an American Crow...

Definitely an American Crow... Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: OK, I can't resist including some more Purple Gallinule images. Another individual foraging on willow buds in the Everglades.

OK, I can't resist including some more Purple Gallinule images. Another individual foraging on willow buds in the Everglades. Photo by Bill Hubick.

OK, I can't resist including some more Purple Gallinule images. Another individual foraging on willow buds in the Everglades. Photo by Bill Hubick.

OK, I can't resist including some more Purple Gallinule images. Another individual foraging on willow buds in the Everglades. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Limpkins at dusk at Viera Wetlands, Florida, caught via high-speed exposure in near darkness (2/26/2010).

Limpkins at dusk at Viera Wetlands, Florida, caught via high-speed exposure in near darkness (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Limpkins at dusk at Viera Wetlands, Florida, caught via high-speed exposure in near darkness (2/26/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Sandhill Cranes grudgingly move out of the way at Viera Wetlands. Note the variation in iris color between the three individuals.

Sandhill Cranes grudgingly move out of the way at Viera Wetlands. Note the variation in iris color between the three individuals. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Sandhill Cranes grudgingly move out of the way at Viera Wetlands. Note the variation in iris color between the three individuals. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Sandhill Cranes grudgingly move out of the way at Viera Wetlands. Note the variation in iris color between the three individuals. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Sandhill Cranes grudgingly move out of the way at Viera Wetlands. Note the variation in iris color between the three individuals. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A high-speed exposure catches a Snail Kite as it goes to roost at dusk in the Everglades (2/26/2010)..

A high-speed exposure catches a Snail Kite as it goes to roost at dusk in the Everglades (2/26/2010).. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Just knowing there's a chance of a sighting lends excitement to any night in the Everglades.

Just knowing there's a <em>chance</em> of a sighting lends excitement to any night in the Everglades. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A very distant Parasitic Jaeger beating up the local Forster's Terns and Bonaparte's Gulls - near St. Augustine, Florida (2/28/2010).

A very distant Parasitic Jaeger beating up the local Forster's Terns and Bonaparte's Gulls - near St. Augustine, Florida (2/28/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

A very distant Parasitic Jaeger beating up the local Forster's Terns and Bonaparte's Gulls - near St. Augustine, Florida (2/28/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Atlantic Right Whales off Matanzas Inlet near St. Augustine were the rarest sighting of the trip. With a global population of only about 400 individuals, it was amazingly good fortune that we got to enjoy this mother and calf. Good job, Kim Hafner, for spotting them! The first three images show the mother, while the remaining images show the playing calf. Click any image to view higher-resolution versions. Hopefully the images of the mother will be sufficient for the research team to identify her.

Atlantic Right Whales off Matanzas Inlet near St. Augustine were the rarest sighting of the trip. With a global population of only about 400 individuals, it was amazingly good fortune that we got to enjoy this mother and calf. Good job, Kim Hafner, for spotting them! The first three images show the mother, while the remaining images show the playing calf. Click any image to view higher-resolution versions. Hopefully the images of the mother will be sufficient for the research team to identify her. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Atlantic Right Whales off Matanzas Inlet near St. Augustine were the rarest sighting of the trip. With a global population of only about 400 individuals, it was amazingly good fortune that we got to enjoy this mother and calf. Good job, Kim Hafner, for spotting them! The first three images show the mother, while the remaining images show the playing calf. Click any image to view higher-resolution versions. Hopefully the images of the mother will be sufficient for the research team to identify her. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Atlantic Right Whales off Matanzas Inlet near St. Augustine were the rarest sighting of the trip. With a global population of only about 400 individuals, it was amazingly good fortune that we got to enjoy this mother and calf. Good job, Kim Hafner, for spotting them! The first three images show the mother, while the remaining images show the playing calf. Click any image to view higher-resolution versions. Hopefully the images of the mother will be sufficient for the research team to identify her. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Atlantic Right Whales off Matanzas Inlet near St. Augustine were the rarest sighting of the trip. With a global population of only about 400 individuals, it was amazingly good fortune that we got to enjoy this mother and calf. Good job, Kim Hafner, for spotting them! The first three images show the mother, while the remaining images show the playing calf. Click any image to view higher-resolution versions. Hopefully the images of the mother will be sufficient for the research team to identify her. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Atlantic Right Whales off Matanzas Inlet near St. Augustine were the rarest sighting of the trip. With a global population of only about 400 individuals, it was amazingly good fortune that we got to enjoy this mother and calf. Good job, Kim Hafner, for spotting them! The first three images show the mother, while the remaining images show the playing calf. Click any image to view higher-resolution versions. Hopefully the images of the mother will be sufficient for the research team to identify her. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Atlantic Right Whales off Matanzas Inlet near St. Augustine were the rarest sighting of the trip. With a global population of only about 400 individuals, it was amazingly good fortune that we got to enjoy this mother and calf. Good job, Kim Hafner, for spotting them! The first three images show the mother, while the remaining images show the playing calf. Click any image to view higher-resolution versions. Hopefully the images of the mother will be sufficient for the research team to identify her. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Atlantic Right Whales off Matanzas Inlet near St. Augustine were the rarest sighting of the trip. With a global population of only about 400 individuals, it was amazingly good fortune that we got to enjoy this mother and calf. Good job, Kim Hafner, for spotting them! The first three images show the mother, while the remaining images show the playing calf. Click any image to view higher-resolution versions. Hopefully the images of the mother will be sufficient for the research team to identify her. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A drake Hooded Merganser in Worcester Co., Maryland (2/21/2010).

A drake Hooded Merganser in Worcester Co., Maryland (2/21/2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.


First page of Florida images (Feb 2010)


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