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Page 5 of Panama Photos. Last updated: 8/23/10.

This delightful creature, an Olingo, was willing to approach our huts in Nusagandi, Panama to take advantage of an  abundance of palm fruit. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Above and below: This delightful creature, an Olingo, was willing to approach our huts in Nusagandi, Panama to take advantage of an abundance of palm fruit.

This delightful creature, an Olingo, was willing to approach our huts in Nusagandi, Panama to take advantage of an  abundance of palm fruit. Photo by Bill Hubick.

This delightful creature, an Olingo, was willing to approach our huts in Nusagandi, Panama to take advantage of an  abundance of palm fruit. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: When the lodge's vehicle returned in the late evening, the Olingo ran to the edge of the tree to investigate.

When the lodge's vehicle returned in the late evening, the Olingo ran to the edge of the tree to investigate. Photo by Bill Hubick.

When the lodge's vehicle returned in the late evening, the Olingo ran to the edge of the tree to investigate. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Whooping Motmot (split from Blue-crowned Motmot) poses in the town of Gamboa, Panama (Aug 2010).

A Whooping Motmot (split from Blue-crowned Motmot) poses in the town of Gamboa, Panama (Aug 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: The short trills of the local subspecies of Vermiculated Screech-Owl were common in the foothills around Nusagandi, Panama (August 2010). This individual was calling spontaneously, but flew in quickly to whistled imitations.

The short trills of the local subspecies of Vermiculated Screech-Owl were common in the foothills around Nusagandi, Panama (August 2010). This individual was calling spontaneously, but flew in quickly to whistled imitations. Photo by Bill Hubick.

The short trills of the local subspecies of Vermiculated Screech-Owl were common in the foothills around Nusagandi, Panama (August 2010). This individual was calling spontaneously, but flew in quickly to whistled imitations. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A False Coral Snake (Oxyrhopus petola) found at night in eastern Panama. The large eyes are the biggest clue that we are dealing with a non-venomous species, though not catching that in the field made this an exciting encounter.

A False Coral Snake (<em>Oxyrhopus petola</em>) found at night in eastern Panama. The large eyes are the biggest clue that we are dealing with a non-venomous species, though not catching that in the field made this an exciting encounter. Photo by Bill Hubick.

A False Coral Snake (<em>Oxyrhopus petola</em>) found at night in eastern Panama. The large eyes are the biggest clue that we are dealing with a non-venomous species, though not catching that in the field made this an exciting encounter. Photo by Bill Hubick.

A False Coral Snake (<em>Oxyrhopus petola</em>) found at night in eastern Panama. The large eyes are the biggest clue that we are dealing with a non-venomous species, though not catching that in the field made this an exciting encounter. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: This Palm Tanager and its mate were nesting at the Canopy Tower. The subtle beauty of this ubiquitous rainforest species is certainly underappreciated. (Gamboa, August 2010)

This Palm Tanager and its mate were nesting at the Canopy Tower. The subtle beauty of this ubiquitous rainforest species is certainly underappreciated. (Gamboa, August 2010) Photo by Bill Hubick.

This Palm Tanager and its mate were nesting at the Canopy Tower. The subtle beauty of this ubiquitous rainforest species is certainly underappreciated. (Gamboa, August 2010) Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Common Opossum found on a night outing in the Nusagandi area of Panama (August 2010).

A Common Opossum found on a night outing in the Nusagandi area of Panama (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Easily my new favorite gecko in the world, the impossibly beautiful Sphaerodactylus homolepis - eastern Panama (August 2010).

Easily my new favorite gecko in the world, the impossibly beautiful <em>Sphaerodactylus homolepis</em> - eastern Panama (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A presumed Turnip-tailed Gecko (with less obvious namesake tail) (Thecadactylus rapicauda) in eastern Panama (August 2010).

A presumed Turnip-tailed Gecko (with less obvious namesake tail) (<em>Thecadactylus rapicauda</em>) in eastern Panama (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: This beautiful Tawny-capped Euphonia landed just overhead in the rainforest at Nusagandi, obviously curious at our passing.

This beautiful Tawny-capped Euphonia landed just overhead in the rainforest at Nusagandi, obviously curious at our passing. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Common Pauraque, common in the foothills near Nusagandi, allows a short photo shoot at the roadside (August 2010).

A Common Pauraque, common in the foothills near Nusagandi, allows a short photo shoot at the roadside (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A grasshopper species (similar to our toothpick grasshoppers) in eastern Panama (August 2010).

A grasshopper species (similar to our toothpick grasshoppers) in eastern Panama (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Litter Toad (Bufo typhonius) in the Nusagandi area of Panama (August 2010).

A Litter Toad (<em>Bufo typhonius</em>) in the Nusagandi area of Panama (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: The enormous Marine Toad (aka Cane Toad) was common around Gamboa, Panama (August 2010). My friend Tom Feild poses for scale in one of our nightly walks.

The enormous Marine Toad (aka Cane Toad) was common around Gamboa, Panama (August 2010). My friend Tom Feild poses for scale in one of our nightly walks. Photo by Bill Hubick.

The enormous Marine Toad (aka Cane Toad) was common around Gamboa, Panama (August 2010). My friend Tom Feild poses for scale in one of our nightly walks. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A female Western Slaty-Antshrike executes a successful attack run on Pipeline Road, Panama (August 2010).

A female Western Slaty-Antshrike executes a successful attack run on Pipeline Road, Panama (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Climbing toward the sun in eastern Panama (August 2010).

Climbing toward the sun in eastern Panama (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A delicate frog species in the Nusagandi area of Panama (August 2010). I'm still working on this ID.

A delicate frog species in the Nusagandi area of Panama (August 2010). I'm still working on this ID. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: This Nine-banded Armadillo was so preoccupied in its roadside foraging that it approached quite closely before noticing us. I was crouched down quietly 8' away before it looked up and ran into the forest (Gamboa area, August 2010).

This Nine-banded Armadillo was so preoccupied in its roadside foraging that it approached quite closely before noticing us. I was crouched down quietly 8' away before it looked up and ran into the forest (Gamboa area, August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Spotting this beautiful and terrifying creature while walking in a remote streambed was a moment I won't forget. Presumably one of the coral snake mimics based on broken rings and seemingly large eye, it is quite similar to Central American Coral Snake (Micrurus nigrocinctus). Note its companion on the rock.

Spotting this beautiful and terrifying creature while walking in a remote streambed was a moment I won't forget. Presumably one of the coral snake mimics based on broken rings and seemingly large eye, it is quite similar to Central American Coral Snake (<em>Micrurus nigrocinctus</em>). Note its companion on the rock. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Spotting this beautiful and terrifying creature while walking in a remote streambed was a moment I won't forget. Presumably one of the coral snake mimics based on broken rings and seemingly large eye, it is quite similar to Central American Coral Snake (<em>Micrurus nigrocinctus</em>). Note its companion on the rock. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: The Pied Puffbird is the smallest of the local puffbirds. At least one local birder nicknamed it "Puffito" (slang for little puffbird). (Gamboa area, Panama, August 2010).

The Pied Puffbird is the smallest of the local puffbirds. At least one local birder nicknamed it "Puffito" (slang for little puffbird). (Gamboa area, Panama, August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Our sharp-eyed guide in Nusagandi spotted this beautiful Elegant Litter Snake (Rhadinea decorata) despite its remaining motionless and well-hidden. (August 2010)

Our sharp-eyed guide in Nusagandi spotted this beautiful Elegant Litter Snake (<em>Rhadinea decorata</em>) despite its remaining motionless and well-hidden. (August 2010)  Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: The calls of the Tungara Frog (Engystomops pustulosus) were one of my favorite sounds of the Panamanian rainforest (August 2010). Displaying males find a hollow area and boom their explosive "Tooong!" calls. This will be among the many sound recordings I post when I catch up on photos (someday!).

The calls of the Tungara Frog (<em>Engystomops pustulosus</em>) were one of my favorite sounds of the Panamanian rainforest (August 2010). Displaying males find a hollow area and boom their explosive "Tooong!" calls. This will be among the many sound recordings I post when I catch up on photos (someday!). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Listen to audio - Tungara Frogs

Below: A Water Anole (Anolis aquaticus) in eastern Panama (August 2010).

A Water Anole (<em>Anolis aquaticus</em>) in eastern Panama (August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A distinctive seam in this palm leaf betrays the presence of its industrious residents.

A distinctive seam in this palm leaf betrays the presence of its industrious residents. Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Common Tent-making Bats carefully bite large palm leaves to create a dry and comfortable roost in the rainforest (Nusagandi, Panama, August 2010).

Common Tent-making Bats carefully bite large palm leaves to create a dry and comfortable roost in the rainforest (Nusagandi, Panama, August 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

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