New Additions

Page 3 of Panama photos. Last updated: 7/29/2010.

A personal favorite, one of the more difficult species to see in the Panamanian rainforest, the Pheasant Cuckoo. My friend Tom Feild has heard it called "Ghost of the Squirrel Cuckoo". (Panama, July 2010) Photo by Bill Hubick.

Above: A personal favorite, one of the more difficult species to see in the Panamanian rainforest, the Pheasant Cuckoo. My friend Tom Feild has heard it called "Ghost of the Squirrel Cuckoo". (Panama, July 2010)

A personal favorite, one of the more difficult species to see in the Panamanian rainforest, the Pheasant Cuckoo. My friend Tom Feild has heard it called "Ghost of the Squirrel Cuckoo". (Panama, July 2010) Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A male Red-capped Manakin surveys his domain (Panama, July 2010).

A male Red-capped Manakin surveys his domain (Panama, July 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: An adult White-necked Jacobin rests briefly at a favorite perch (Panama, July 2010).

An adult White-necked Jacobin rests briefly at a favorite perch (Panama, July 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: To everyone's delight, Blue Morphos were among the most common butterflies in the central Panamanian rainforest. They were certainly the most conspicuous. The delicate beauty of this individual's outer wings give little hint at the impossible blue above. This was the only one I saw perched during my full stay. (Panama, July 2010)

To everyone's delight, Blue Morphos were among the most common butterflies in the central Panamanian rainforest. They were certainly the most conspicuous. The delicate beauty of this individual's outer wings give little hint at the impossible blue above. This was the only one I saw perched during my full stay. (Panama, July 2010) Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A wonderfully cooperative Rufescent Tiger-Heron near Gamboa, Panama (July 2010). When my wife Becky later spotted her first skulking through dense vegetation, she called back, "I have a bittern." I totally see why. I could get used to "Tiger-Bittern"...

A wonderfully cooperative Rufescent Tiger-Heron near Gamboa, Panama (July 2010). When my wife Becky later spotted her first skulking through dense vegetation, she called back, "I have a bittern." I totally see why. I could get used to "Tiger-Bittern"... Photo by Bill Hubick.

A wonderfully cooperative Rufescent Tiger-Heron near Gamboa, Panama (July 2010). When my wife Becky later spotted her first skulking through dense vegetation, she called back, "I have a bittern." I totally see why. I could get used to "Tiger-Bittern"... Photo by Bill Hubick.

A wonderfully cooperative Rufescent Tiger-Heron near Gamboa, Panama (July 2010). When my wife Becky later spotted her first skulking through dense vegetation, she called back, "I have a bittern." I totally see why. I could get used to "Tiger-Bittern"... Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A rubyspot species in central Panama (July 2010).

A rubyspot species in central Panama (July 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: An immature Double-toothed Kite in central Panama (July 2010).

An immature Double-toothed Kite in central Panama (July 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Pale-vented Pigeon nearly avoids detection (Gamboa, Panama, July 2010).

A Pale-vented Pigeon nearly avoids detection (Gamboa, Panama, July 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: An unusually cooperative Plain Wren poses for a brief photo shoot (Panama, July 2010).

An unusually cooperative Plain Wren poses for a brief photo shoot (Panama, July 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

An unusually cooperative Plain Wren poses for a brief photo shoot (Panama, July 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: Yellow-headed Caracaras - Adult and juvenile, respectively (Gamboa, Panama, July 2010)

Yellow-headed Caracaras - Adult and juvenile, respectively (Gamboa, Panama, July 2010) Photo by Bill Hubick.

Yellow-headed Caracaras - Adult and juvenile, respectively (Gamboa, Panama, July 2010) Photo by Bill Hubick.

Below: A Mantled Howler Monkey in the canopy, Semaphore Hill Road, Panama (July 2010).

A Mantled Howler Monkey in the canopy, Semaphore Hill Road, Panama (July 2010). Photo by Bill Hubick.

A Rufescent Tiger-Heron kills its prey with its eyes (Panama, July 2010)

A Rufescent Tiger-Heron kills its prey with its eyes (Panama, July 2010) Photo by Bill Hubick.

Previous  |  Next  |  Random


Find out about updates via Facebook Group

Go to Top

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites






All photos 2001-2015 © www.billhubick.com